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Mount Logan is located in the St. Elias Mountain Range of Canada’s Yukon Territory and is the second highest peak in North America. The Mount Logan massif is part of the most extensive non-polar icefield in the world. The climb is similar to Denali in expedition character and length, yet more extreme due to its remoteness and level of commitment. Our guided expedition of Mount  Logan epitomizes Mountain Madness’ spirit of adventure. The region’s scale is enormous. Not only is Mount Logan’s bulk “more than any other mountain in the Western Hemisphere,” but its neighbors – Mt. Saint Elias, Mt. Bona, Mts. King and McArthur – boast equally massive relief and equally storied mountaineering histories.

Mount Logan

Our route of choice – the King Trench – was the one used for the mountain’s first ascent in June, 1925. Unprecedented in audacity, scale, and logistical challenge, and culminating in a desperate float down the Chitna River when all team members could no longer walk due to frostbite, many consider the original expedition to be “among the most arduous mountain adventures ever undertaken.” It is all the more impressive in that it was the first ever attempt, by any route, on the mountain – a true adventure of epic proportions into the unknown.

Climb Mount Logan

With the help of an air taxi approach to the Alaskan-Yukon border, today’s teams can cut expedition length to a manageable three weeks. While the King Trench is far and away the most frequently climbed route on Logan, it is unlike Denali, which has a semi-permanent park service ranger patrol, hundreds of climbers at camp and on route, and never-ending plane traffic. The climbing style of the two is quite similar, however, with four to five camps being made in the course of two weeks, a carry high-sleep low tactic, and all loads being carried by team members with the use of glacier sleds.

Mt. Logan

The traverse of Logan’s summit area presents a considerable high-altitude effort of almost 4 miles of climbing between 17,600 feet and the true summit at 19,551 feet. Combine this with all its other challenges – significant glacier travel through icefalls and huge crevasses, cold temperatures, and extreme weather due to its proximity to the Gulf of Alaska – and we consider Logan to be one of the most strenuous high-altitude climbs we offer at Mountain Madness. The amount of guided attempts has been few so this will be a golden opportunity, especially for Canadians, to summit Canada’s highest peak!

Climb Mt. Logan

Itinerary

Logan is a big, serious mountain with big mountain weather, geography and acclimatization issues. The following itinerary represents a very basic outline of what could happen on a given day during the course of a Logan expedition. Many factors can, and probably will, contribute to cause the following schedule to change. Our guides know the mountain and may elect to stray from this itinerary in order to give you the best possible shot at getting to the summit.

Day 1

Whitehorse, Yukon

The team meeting at 10am in Whitehorse at the Days Inn Hotel (2288 Second Avenue) for a trip briefing. We’ll then have individual gear checks. This allows time to pick up last minute gear and supplies at the Canadian Superstore, Riverside Grocery, and Coastal Mountain Sports (http://www.cmsyukon.ca).

Day 2

Kluane Lake – Basecamp
Elevation: 8,860 feet / 2,700 meters

Depart at 7am for Kluane Lake (two hours by shuttle), and then fly to Base Camp. Weather permitting, we’ll fly to base camp on the Quintino Sella Glacier.

Day 3-4

Extra fly in days

Day 5

Camp 1
Elevation: 8,860 feet / 2,700 meters

Single carry to Camp 1. A six-hour, night-schedule haul on lower angle glacier to the entrance of the King Trench.

Day 6

Camp 2
Elevation: 10,800 feet / 3,290 meters

Carry to Camp 2.

Day 7

Camp 2

King Trench Camp Move to Camp 2.

Day 8

Rest Day

Rest at Camp 2.

Day 9

Carry
Elevation: 13,400 feet / 4,085 meters

King Col Carry to 12,500 below Camp 3, return to Camp 2.

Day 10

Camp 3
Elevation: 13,400 feet / 4,085 meters

Move to Camp 3 at King Col.

Day 11

Carry
Elevation: 13,400 feet / 4,085 meters

Back carry and rest at Camp 3.

Day 12

Carry through MacCarthy Gap
Elevation:15,300 feet / 4,663 meters

Carry to 15,300 feet. From King Col we’ll route find up the MacCarthy Gap, a 1,500-foot high slope with angles of up to 45 degrees. This is a crux of the climb, but does not involve technical climbing. Make a cache at around 15,300 feet for Camp 4 and return to King Col.

Day 13

Camp 4
Elevation: 15,300 feet / 4,663 meters

Move to Camp 4.

Day 14

Rest/Acclimatization Day
Elevation: 15,300 feet / 4,663 meters

A short day to rest and acclimatize. Possibly move a small load.

Day 15

Carry
Elevation: 18,130 feet / 5,525 meters

Carry to Prospector’s Col (Iona Col) at about 18,000 feet and leave a cache. Return to Camp 4. A tough day at altitude.

Day 16

Rest/Acclimatization Day
Elevation: 15,300 feet / 4,663 meters

Rest and acclimatize at Camp 4 before the big move to high camp.

Day 17

Camp 5
Elevation: 16,900 feet / 5,150 meters

Move to Camp 5 on the summit plateau. We’ll grab three days of food at Prospector’s Col along the way before descending to camp on the great ice plateau.

Day 18-22

Summit
Elevation: 19,551 feet / 5,959 meters

Possible summit days. It is a long, high altitude walk of 3 – 4 miles to the summit from high camp. It is not difficult terrain, but a very demanding day of 10-15 hours. Return to camp 5.

Day 23

Camp 4
Elevation: 15,300 feet / 4,663 meters

Climb back over Prospectors Col and descend to Camp 4.

Day 24

Camp 2
Elevation: 10,800 feet / 3,290 meters

Descend to Camp 2 or continue as far as possible. We’ll collect caches along the way. At Camp 2 we’ll switch back to night schedule for the lower-elevation travel to Base Camp.

Day 25

Whitehorse

Descend to Base Camp. Fly to Kluane Lake and transfer to Whitehorse.

1 Review for Mount Logan

Dan

3 Reviews

Epic trip to the world's largest non-polar icecap

Year of Expedtion: 2019

View All

4.8

I spent nine days on the expedition before altitude issues forced me to make an early departure. Overall the trip was great and I have no regrets. The guides were exceptional. They used their skill and mountaineering knowledge to keep the team safe as we ascended from the glacier airstrip up the King Trench. I also appreciated the pilots from Icefield Discovery in Silver City, Yukon getting the team on and off the mountain without incident. Any trip to the St. Elias Range is about managing expectations. If you’re laser-focused on bagging a summit, you may walk away unhappy from a Mount Logan climb. But if you want to experience soul-enriching solitude, glacier travel on the world’s largest non-polar icecap, the camaraderie of a climbing team in the wilderness, and adventure outside the range of cell towers and Instagram, this trip is for you. I would repeat this trip without question.

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